Discussion:
Personal Responsibility? What Personal Responsibility? The Washington Post Explains How Aspiring Supreme Court Justice George Floyd Was Destroyed by Systemic Racism
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Michael Ejercito
2020-10-13 03:25:57 UTC
Permalink
http://ethicsalarms.com/2020/10/12/personal-responsibility-what-personal-responsibility-the-washington-post-explains-how-aspiring-supreme-court-justice-george-floyd-was-destroyed-by-systemic-racism



October 12, 2020 / Jack Marshall

Screen shot of George Floyd mural

You think I’m kidding, don’t you? Sadly, I’m not.

Here’s a silver lining: thanks to the parade of bizarre and illogical
demands and assertions during the George Floyd Ethics Train Wreck and
the concomitant “Great Stupid,” my head appears to be immune from
explosions. (Is head immunity anything like herd immunity? A topic for
another time…)

It is amazing—I would have once said head exploding—that anyone would
attempt to sanctify a long-time criminal and blight on his community
like George Floyd, much less get away with it. Nonetheless, months
after Floyd died after a cruel and incompetent (but not racist) police
officer put his knee on Floyd’s neck, the news media and Black Lives
Matter flacks are successfully selling the tall tale that his life was a
tragedy of unfulfilled potential because he had the misfortune to live
in the United States of America.

[Quick review: Floyd moved to Minneapolis after being released from
Texas prison for aggravated robbery. He went to jail 5 times and as a
perusal of his record shows, he can be fairly described as a career
criminal. Floyd was a habitual lawbreaker, involved in drug abuse,
theft, criminal trespassing, and aggravated robbery, who once broke into
a woman’s home and pointed a gun at her stomach while looking for drugs
and money. He had probably taken an overdose of fentanyl and
methamphetamine at the time of arrest, and it is quite likely that this,
and not Derek Chauvin’s knee, is what killed him.]

I’m old enough, more’s the pity, to remember the Sixties fad of arguing
that all criminals were victims of their upbringing and a Hobbesian
society for those who were not white and rich, and that it was heartless
to punish those who were really society’s victims, not its predators.
This was a very old progressive trope, notably championed by Clarence
Darrow, who argued that there is no free will, and that criminals are
doomed from birth, this making it an abuse of power for society to
punish them. This logic was the epitome of bleeding heart liberalism,
and helped make the word “liberal” a term of derision. I did not expect
it to make a comeback.

Yes, I’m an idiot.

Now, however, in no less a legitimate forum than the Washington Post,
Toluse Olorunnipa and Griff Witte make the argument that if the U.S
wasn’t so racist, Floyd, despite all outward appearances, might have
been a great American.

Read the thing, take a while to tape your skull back together, and then
resume reading here. Watch out; this is the third paragraph, and it
comes up quick:

“Early in life, he wanted to be a Supreme Court justice. Then, a
pro athlete. At the end, he just longed for a little stability, training
to be a commercial truck driver.“

If I recall, I wanted to be Superman early in life. Is that information
really relevant to anything? I strongly suspect that if young George was
really interested in a judicial career, he might have begun by learning
some basics about the law, like, say “Don’t break it.” After Superman
looked like a non-starter, I moved my ambition to the Presidency. By the
fifth grade, I had read every book about Presidents I could find at the
library. My parents started me off with a paperback that cost about
three bucks. The Post article never explains how systemic racism
prevents curiosity, initiative, and achievement.

[ Quick Review 2: George was one of five children born to parents who
weren’t married, and followed the family tradition, also having five
children with an undetermined number of women, setting those kids out on
the same perilous life path he trod. Interestingly, I can find no
example of a Supreme Court Justice who accumulated offspring out of
wedlock.]

Some highlights on this long, meticulously researched ( “according to an
extensive review of his life based on hundreds of documents and
interviews with more than 150 people, including his siblings, extended
family members, friends, colleagues, public officials and scholars”)
rationalization for the failed life of George Floyd:

“Floyd was born in Fayetteville, N.C., in 1973, a time when
Whites-only service at restaurants and segregated seating in movie
theaters were fresh wounds.”

The Civil Rights Act had been passed a decade earlier. The Post’s
argument seems to be that Floyd was handicapped for life by a system no
longer in existence.

“When Floyd was two days old, Maynard Jackson was elected mayor of
Atlanta. It was the first time a major Southern city would have a Black
leader.“

Again, George Floyd was born into a U.S. where African Americans had
legally ensured opportunities to succeed. He lacked the determination
and character to take advantage of them

“Schools remained deeply unequal as Floyd moved through
predominantly Black classrooms in the 1980s and early 1990s. At Yates, a
former “colored” school named for a minister who was born enslaved, test
scores were low and dropout rates high, with the 1989 valedictorian —
who was seven months pregnant at the time — noting in her graduation
speech that more than half of freshmen had failed to graduate.“

This paragraph is res ipsa loquitur. You have to make a special effort
not to see the irony in it.

“By the time Floyd left high school in 1993, he wasn’t academically
prepared to go to college. But his athletic skills earned him a place at
a two-year program in South Florida before he transferred closer to home
— to Texas A&M University-Kingsville, a small, mostly Latino school
known as a pipeline to the NFL.“

A cynical critic of this section writes, with some justification, “It’s
so racist that if you’re a non-Asian minority, you’re more likely to get
into college than a white or Asian student with the same test scores.”

“Floyd, a tight end, went to practice every day, but he wasn’t
making the grades or completing the credits that would have allowed him
to get on the field.“

Floyd had an opportunity. He didn’t make the most of it. Blaming anyone
but himself makes him a victim of a not systemic racism, but cultural
maleducation.

“Floyd’s time in college ended with neither a degree nor a draft
into professional sports. With his two planned routes out of Third Ward
blocked, he moved back to Cuney Homes in 1997.“

Blocked? Blocked? Who blocked them? Floyd was in complete control of
whether he would graduate, or excel in sports sufficiently to make it
his career. He also was responsible fr failing to use college to develop
skills that would help him gain employment should his sports aspirations
not pan out.

“It didn’t take much time before he was in trouble with the law.
Police — described by residents as an omnipresent force around Cuney
Homes — arrested him in August 1997 for delivering less than a gram of
cocaine.”

Ah, if only Floyd had read a bit about what becoming a Supreme Court
Justice entailed! Meanwhile, the Post’s argument is that the presence of
police caused Floyd’s criminal conduct. After all, if a crime is
committed without being detected, was it really committed at all?

“The most serious charge that Floyd faced was in 2007, for
aggravated robbery with a deadly weapon. Prosecutors said the
then-33-year-old and four others forced their way into a private home
and that Floyd had held a woman at gunpoint while others ransacked the
place, looking for drugs and money….After a plea deal, Floyd would spend
four years at a privately run prison nearly three hours northwest of
Houston.”

Mass incarceration! George Floyd received just four years in prison for
armed robbery. The Post doesn’t mention it, but the victims were
Hispanic, and the woman who had the gun pointed at her stomach was pregnant.

Anyone who finds the Post article to constitute a convincing argument
that anyone but George Floyd—and the tragically self-destructive
community that acculturated him— is responsible for his miserable,
anti-social, drug- and crime-polluted life is not worth arguing with.

The scary question is: How many such people are there?
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
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NEMO
2020-10-13 10:20:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Ejercito
http://ethicsalarms.com/2020/10/12/personal-responsibility-what-personal-responsibility-the-washington-post-explains-how-aspiring-supreme-court-justice-george-floyd-was-destroyed-by-systemic-racism
October 12, 2020 / Jack Marshall
Screen shot of George Floyd mural
You think I’m kidding, don’t you? Sadly, I’m not.
Here’s a silver lining: thanks to the parade of bizarre and illogical
demands and assertions during the George Floyd Ethics Train Wreck and
the concomitant “Great Stupid,” my head appears to be immune from
explosions. (Is head immunity anything like herd immunity? A topic for
another time…)
It is amazing—I would have once said head exploding—that anyone would
attempt to sanctify a long-time criminal and blight on his community
like George Floyd, much less get away with it. Nonetheless, months
after Floyd died after a cruel and incompetent (but not racist) police
officer put his knee on Floyd’s neck, the news media and Black Lives
Matter flacks are successfully selling the tall tale that his life was a
tragedy of unfulfilled potential because he had the misfortune to live
in the United States of America.
[Quick review: Floyd moved to Minneapolis after being released from
Texas prison for aggravated robbery. He went to jail 5 times and as a
perusal of his record shows, he can be fairly described as a career
criminal. Floyd was a habitual lawbreaker, involved in drug abuse,
theft, criminal trespassing, and aggravated robbery, who once broke into
a woman’s home and pointed a gun at her stomach while looking for drugs
and money. He had probably taken an overdose of fentanyl and
methamphetamine at the time of arrest, and it is quite likely that this,
and not Derek Chauvin’s knee, is what killed him.]
I’m old enough, more’s the pity, to remember the Sixties fad of arguing
that all criminals were victims of their upbringing and a Hobbesian
society for those who were not white and rich, and that it was heartless
to punish those who were really society’s victims, not its predators.
This was a very old progressive trope, notably championed by Clarence
Darrow, who argued that there is no free will, and that criminals are
doomed from birth, this making it an abuse of power for society to
punish them. This logic was the epitome of bleeding heart liberalism,
and helped make the word “liberal” a term of derision. I did not expect
it to make a comeback.
Yes, I’m an idiot.
Now, however, in no less a legitimate forum than the Washington Post,
Toluse Olorunnipa and Griff Witte make the argument that if the U.S
wasn’t so racist, Floyd, despite all outward appearances, might have
been a great American.
Read the thing, take a while to tape your skull back together, and then
resume reading here. Watch out; this is the third paragraph, and it
“Early in life, he wanted to be a Supreme Court justice. Then, a
pro athlete. At the end, he just longed for a little stability, training
to be a commercial truck driver.“
If I recall, I wanted to be Superman early in life. Is that information
really relevant to anything? I strongly suspect that if young George was
really interested in a judicial career, he might have begun by learning
some basics about the law, like, say “Don’t break it.” After Superman
looked like a non-starter, I moved my ambition to the Presidency. By the
fifth grade, I had read every book about Presidents I could find at the
library. My parents started me off with a paperback that cost about
three bucks. The Post article never explains how systemic racism
prevents curiosity, initiative, and achievement.
[ Quick Review 2: George was one of five children born to parents who
weren’t married, and followed the family tradition, also having five
children with an undetermined number of women, setting those kids out on
the same perilous life path he trod. Interestingly, I can find no
example of a Supreme Court Justice who accumulated offspring out of
wedlock.]
Some highlights on this long, meticulously researched ( “according to an
extensive review of his life based on hundreds of documents and
interviews with more than 150 people, including his siblings, extended
family members, friends, colleagues, public officials and scholars”)
“Floyd was born in Fayetteville, N.C., in 1973, a time when
Whites-only service at restaurants and segregated seating in movie
theaters were fresh wounds.”
The Civil Rights Act had been passed a decade earlier. The Post’s
argument seems to be that Floyd was handicapped for life by a system no
longer in existence.
“When Floyd was two days old, Maynard Jackson was elected mayor of
Atlanta. It was the first time a major Southern city would have a Black
leader.“
Again, George Floyd was born into a U.S. where African Americans had
legally ensured opportunities to succeed. He lacked the determination
and character to take advantage of them
“Schools remained deeply unequal as Floyd moved through
predominantly Black classrooms in the 1980s and early 1990s. At Yates, a
former “colored” school named for a minister who was born enslaved, test
scores were low and dropout rates high, with the 1989 valedictorian —
who was seven months pregnant at the time — noting in her graduation
speech that more than half of freshmen had failed to graduate.“
This paragraph is res ipsa loquitur. You have to make a special effort
not to see the irony in it.
“By the time Floyd left high school in 1993, he wasn’t academically
prepared to go to college. But his athletic skills earned him a place at
a two-year program in South Florida before he transferred closer to home
— to Texas A&M University-Kingsville, a small, mostly Latino school
known as a pipeline to the NFL.“
A cynical critic of this section writes, with some justification, “It’s
so racist that if you’re a non-Asian minority, you’re more likely to get
into college than a white or Asian student with the same test scores.”
“Floyd, a tight end, went to practice every day, but he wasn’t
making the grades or completing the credits that would have allowed him
to get on the field.“
Floyd had an opportunity. He didn’t make the most of it. Blaming anyone
but himself makes him a victim of a not systemic racism, but cultural
maleducation.
“Floyd’s time in college ended with neither a degree nor a draft
into professional sports. With his two planned routes out of Third Ward
blocked, he moved back to Cuney Homes in 1997.“
Blocked? Blocked? Who blocked them? Floyd was in complete control of
whether he would graduate, or excel in sports sufficiently to make it
his career. He also was responsible fr failing to use college to develop
skills that would help him gain employment should his sports aspirations
not pan out.
“It didn’t take much time before he was in trouble with the law.
Police — described by residents as an omnipresent force around Cuney
Homes — arrested him in August 1997 for delivering less than a gram of
cocaine.”
Ah, if only Floyd had read a bit about what becoming a Supreme Court
Justice entailed! Meanwhile, the Post’s argument is that the presence of
police caused Floyd’s criminal conduct. After all, if a crime is
committed without being detected, was it really committed at all?
“The most serious charge that Floyd faced was in 2007, for
aggravated robbery with a deadly weapon. Prosecutors said the
then-33-year-old and four others forced their way into a private home
and that Floyd had held a woman at gunpoint while others ransacked the
place, looking for drugs and money….After a plea deal, Floyd would spend
four years at a privately run prison nearly three hours northwest of
Houston.”
Mass incarceration! George Floyd received just four years in prison for
armed robbery. The Post doesn’t mention it, but the victims were
Hispanic, and the woman who had the gun pointed at her stomach was pregnant.
Anyone who finds the Post article to constitute a convincing argument
that anyone but George Floyd—and the tragically self-destructive
community that acculturated him— is responsible for his miserable,
anti-social, drug- and crime-polluted life is not worth arguing with.
The scary question is: How many such people are there?
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
What about your nigger friend Morton? What's his excuse?
Michael Ejercito
2020-10-13 13:18:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by NEMO
Post by Michael Ejercito
http://ethicsalarms.com/2020/10/12/personal-responsibility-what-personal-responsibility-the-washington-post-explains-how-aspiring-supreme-court-justice-george-floyd-was-destroyed-by-systemic-racism
October 12, 2020 / Jack Marshall
Screen shot of George Floyd mural
You think I’m kidding, don’t you? Sadly, I’m not.
Here’s a silver lining: thanks to the parade of bizarre and illogical
demands and assertions during the George Floyd Ethics Train Wreck and
the concomitant “Great Stupid,” my head appears to be immune from
explosions. (Is head immunity anything like herd immunity? A topic for
another time…)
It is amazing—I would have once said head exploding—that anyone would
attempt to sanctify a long-time criminal and blight on his community
like George Floyd, much less get away with it. Nonetheless, months
after Floyd died after a cruel and incompetent (but not racist) police
officer put his knee on Floyd’s neck, the news media and Black Lives
Matter flacks are successfully selling the tall tale that his life was a
tragedy of unfulfilled potential because he had the misfortune to live
in the United States of America.
[Quick review: Floyd moved to Minneapolis after being released from
Texas prison for aggravated robbery. He went to jail 5 times and as a
perusal of his record shows, he can be fairly described as a career
criminal. Floyd was a habitual lawbreaker, involved in drug abuse,
theft, criminal trespassing, and aggravated robbery, who once broke into
a woman’s home and pointed a gun at her stomach while looking for drugs
and money. He had probably taken an overdose of fentanyl and
methamphetamine at the time of arrest, and it is quite likely that this,
and not Derek Chauvin’s knee, is what killed him.]
I’m old enough, more’s the pity, to remember the Sixties fad of arguing
that all criminals were victims of their upbringing and a Hobbesian
society for those who were not white and rich, and that it was heartless
to punish those who were really society’s victims, not its predators.
This was a very old progressive trope, notably championed by Clarence
Darrow, who argued that there is no free will, and that criminals are
doomed from birth, this making it an abuse of power for society to
punish them. This logic was the epitome of bleeding heart liberalism,
and helped make the word “liberal” a term of derision. I did not expect
it to make a comeback.
Yes, I’m an idiot.
Now, however, in no less a legitimate forum than the Washington Post,
Toluse Olorunnipa and Griff Witte make the argument that if the U.S
wasn’t so racist, Floyd, despite all outward appearances, might have
been a great American.
Read the thing, take a while to tape your skull back together, and then
resume reading here. Watch out; this is the third paragraph, and it
“Early in life, he wanted to be a Supreme Court justice. Then, a
pro athlete. At the end, he just longed for a little stability, training
to be a commercial truck driver.“
If I recall, I wanted to be Superman early in life. Is that information
really relevant to anything? I strongly suspect that if young George was
really interested in a judicial career, he might have begun by learning
some basics about the law, like, say “Don’t break it.” After Superman
looked like a non-starter, I moved my ambition to the Presidency. By the
fifth grade, I had read every book about Presidents I could find at the
library. My parents started me off with a paperback that cost about
three bucks. The Post article never explains how systemic racism
prevents curiosity, initiative, and achievement.
[ Quick Review 2: George was one of five children born to parents who
weren’t married, and followed the family tradition, also having five
children with an undetermined number of women, setting those kids out on
the same perilous life path he trod. Interestingly, I can find no
example of a Supreme Court Justice who accumulated offspring out of
wedlock.]
Some highlights on this long, meticulously researched ( “according to an
extensive review of his life based on hundreds of documents and
interviews with more than 150 people, including his siblings, extended
family members, friends, colleagues, public officials and scholars”)
“Floyd was born in Fayetteville, N.C., in 1973, a time when
Whites-only service at restaurants and segregated seating in movie
theaters were fresh wounds.”
The Civil Rights Act had been passed a decade earlier. The Post’s
argument seems to be that Floyd was handicapped for life by a system no
longer in existence.
“When Floyd was two days old, Maynard Jackson was elected mayor of
Atlanta. It was the first time a major Southern city would have a Black
leader.“
Again, George Floyd was born into a U.S. where African Americans had
legally ensured opportunities to succeed. He lacked the determination
and character to take advantage of them
“Schools remained deeply unequal as Floyd moved through
predominantly Black classrooms in the 1980s and early 1990s. At Yates, a
former “colored” school named for a minister who was born enslaved, test
scores were low and dropout rates high, with the 1989 valedictorian —
who was seven months pregnant at the time — noting in her graduation
speech that more than half of freshmen had failed to graduate.“
This paragraph is res ipsa loquitur. You have to make a special effort
not to see the irony in it.
“By the time Floyd left high school in 1993, he wasn’t academically
prepared to go to college. But his athletic skills earned him a place at
a two-year program in South Florida before he transferred closer to home
— to Texas A&M University-Kingsville, a small, mostly Latino school
known as a pipeline to the NFL.“
A cynical critic of this section writes, with some justification, “It’s
so racist that if you’re a non-Asian minority, you’re more likely to get
into college than a white or Asian student with the same test scores.”
“Floyd, a tight end, went to practice every day, but he wasn’t
making the grades or completing the credits that would have allowed him
to get on the field.“
Floyd had an opportunity. He didn’t make the most of it. Blaming anyone
but himself makes him a victim of a not systemic racism, but cultural
maleducation.
“Floyd’s time in college ended with neither a degree nor a draft
into professional sports. With his two planned routes out of Third Ward
blocked, he moved back to Cuney Homes in 1997.“
Blocked? Blocked? Who blocked them? Floyd was in complete control of
whether he would graduate, or excel in sports sufficiently to make it
his career. He also was responsible fr failing to use college to develop
skills that would help him gain employment should his sports aspirations
not pan out.
“It didn’t take much time before he was in trouble with the law.
Police — described by residents as an omnipresent force around Cuney
Homes — arrested him in August 1997 for delivering less than a gram of
cocaine.”
Ah, if only Floyd had read a bit about what becoming a Supreme Court
Justice entailed! Meanwhile, the Post’s argument is that the presence of
police caused Floyd’s criminal conduct. After all, if a crime is
committed without being detected, was it really committed at all?
“The most serious charge that Floyd faced was in 2007, for
aggravated robbery with a deadly weapon. Prosecutors said the
then-33-year-old and four others forced their way into a private home
and that Floyd had held a woman at gunpoint while others ransacked the
place, looking for drugs and money….After a plea deal, Floyd would spend
four years at a privately run prison nearly three hours northwest of
Houston.”
Mass incarceration! George Floyd received just four years in prison for
armed robbery. The Post doesn’t mention it, but the victims were
Hispanic, and the woman who had the gun pointed at her stomach was pregnant.
Anyone who finds the Post article to constitute a convincing argument
that anyone but George Floyd—and the tragically self-destructive
community that acculturated him— is responsible for his miserable,
anti-social, drug- and crime-polluted life is not worth arguing with.
The scary question is: How many such people are there?
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
What about your nigger friend Morton? What's his excuse?
He is a law-abiding man, as well as a veteran of the United States Army!


Michael
--
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NEMO
2020-10-14 02:50:22 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 13 Oct 2020 06:18:53 -0700, Michael Ejercito
Post by Michael Ejercito
Post by NEMO
Post by Michael Ejercito
http://ethicsalarms.com/2020/10/12/personal-responsibility-what-personal-responsibility-the-washington-post-explains-how-aspiring-supreme-court-justice-george-floyd-was-destroyed-by-systemic-racism
October 12, 2020 / Jack Marshall
Screen shot of George Floyd mural
You think I’m kidding, don’t you? Sadly, I’m not.
Here’s a silver lining: thanks to the parade of bizarre and illogical
demands and assertions during the George Floyd Ethics Train Wreck and
the concomitant “Great Stupid,” my head appears to be immune from
explosions. (Is head immunity anything like herd immunity? A topic for
another time…)
It is amazing—I would have once said head exploding—that anyone would
attempt to sanctify a long-time criminal and blight on his community
like George Floyd, much less get away with it. Nonetheless, months
after Floyd died after a cruel and incompetent (but not racist) police
officer put his knee on Floyd’s neck, the news media and Black Lives
Matter flacks are successfully selling the tall tale that his life was a
tragedy of unfulfilled potential because he had the misfortune to live
in the United States of America.
[Quick review: Floyd moved to Minneapolis after being released from
Texas prison for aggravated robbery. He went to jail 5 times and as a
perusal of his record shows, he can be fairly described as a career
criminal. Floyd was a habitual lawbreaker, involved in drug abuse,
theft, criminal trespassing, and aggravated robbery, who once broke into
a woman’s home and pointed a gun at her stomach while looking for drugs
and money. He had probably taken an overdose of fentanyl and
methamphetamine at the time of arrest, and it is quite likely that this,
and not Derek Chauvin’s knee, is what killed him.]
I’m old enough, more’s the pity, to remember the Sixties fad of arguing
that all criminals were victims of their upbringing and a Hobbesian
society for those who were not white and rich, and that it was heartless
to punish those who were really society’s victims, not its predators.
This was a very old progressive trope, notably championed by Clarence
Darrow, who argued that there is no free will, and that criminals are
doomed from birth, this making it an abuse of power for society to
punish them. This logic was the epitome of bleeding heart liberalism,
and helped make the word “liberal” a term of derision. I did not expect
it to make a comeback.
Yes, I’m an idiot.
Now, however, in no less a legitimate forum than the Washington Post,
Toluse Olorunnipa and Griff Witte make the argument that if the U.S
wasn’t so racist, Floyd, despite all outward appearances, might have
been a great American.
Read the thing, take a while to tape your skull back together, and then
resume reading here. Watch out; this is the third paragraph, and it
“Early in life, he wanted to be a Supreme Court justice. Then, a
pro athlete. At the end, he just longed for a little stability, training
to be a commercial truck driver.“
If I recall, I wanted to be Superman early in life. Is that information
really relevant to anything? I strongly suspect that if young George was
really interested in a judicial career, he might have begun by learning
some basics about the law, like, say “Don’t break it.” After Superman
looked like a non-starter, I moved my ambition to the Presidency. By the
fifth grade, I had read every book about Presidents I could find at the
library. My parents started me off with a paperback that cost about
three bucks. The Post article never explains how systemic racism
prevents curiosity, initiative, and achievement.
[ Quick Review 2: George was one of five children born to parents who
weren’t married, and followed the family tradition, also having five
children with an undetermined number of women, setting those kids out on
the same perilous life path he trod. Interestingly, I can find no
example of a Supreme Court Justice who accumulated offspring out of
wedlock.]
Some highlights on this long, meticulously researched ( “according to an
extensive review of his life based on hundreds of documents and
interviews with more than 150 people, including his siblings, extended
family members, friends, colleagues, public officials and scholars”)
“Floyd was born in Fayetteville, N.C., in 1973, a time when
Whites-only service at restaurants and segregated seating in movie
theaters were fresh wounds.”
The Civil Rights Act had been passed a decade earlier. The Post’s
argument seems to be that Floyd was handicapped for life by a system no
longer in existence.
“When Floyd was two days old, Maynard Jackson was elected mayor of
Atlanta. It was the first time a major Southern city would have a Black
leader.“
Again, George Floyd was born into a U.S. where African Americans had
legally ensured opportunities to succeed. He lacked the determination
and character to take advantage of them
“Schools remained deeply unequal as Floyd moved through
predominantly Black classrooms in the 1980s and early 1990s. At Yates, a
former “colored” school named for a minister who was born enslaved, test
scores were low and dropout rates high, with the 1989 valedictorian —
who was seven months pregnant at the time — noting in her graduation
speech that more than half of freshmen had failed to graduate.“
This paragraph is res ipsa loquitur. You have to make a special effort
not to see the irony in it.
“By the time Floyd left high school in 1993, he wasn’t academically
prepared to go to college. But his athletic skills earned him a place at
a two-year program in South Florida before he transferred closer to home
— to Texas A&M University-Kingsville, a small, mostly Latino school
known as a pipeline to the NFL.“
A cynical critic of this section writes, with some justification, “It’s
so racist that if you’re a non-Asian minority, you’re more likely to get
into college than a white or Asian student with the same test scores.”
“Floyd, a tight end, went to practice every day, but he wasn’t
making the grades or completing the credits that would have allowed him
to get on the field.“
Floyd had an opportunity. He didn’t make the most of it. Blaming anyone
but himself makes him a victim of a not systemic racism, but cultural
maleducation.
“Floyd’s time in college ended with neither a degree nor a draft
into professional sports. With his two planned routes out of Third Ward
blocked, he moved back to Cuney Homes in 1997.“
Blocked? Blocked? Who blocked them? Floyd was in complete control of
whether he would graduate, or excel in sports sufficiently to make it
his career. He also was responsible fr failing to use college to develop
skills that would help him gain employment should his sports aspirations
not pan out.
“It didn’t take much time before he was in trouble with the law.
Police — described by residents as an omnipresent force around Cuney
Homes — arrested him in August 1997 for delivering less than a gram of
cocaine.”
Ah, if only Floyd had read a bit about what becoming a Supreme Court
Justice entailed! Meanwhile, the Post’s argument is that the presence of
police caused Floyd’s criminal conduct. After all, if a crime is
committed without being detected, was it really committed at all?
“The most serious charge that Floyd faced was in 2007, for
aggravated robbery with a deadly weapon. Prosecutors said the
then-33-year-old and four others forced their way into a private home
and that Floyd had held a woman at gunpoint while others ransacked the
place, looking for drugs and money….After a plea deal, Floyd would spend
four years at a privately run prison nearly three hours northwest of
Houston.”
Mass incarceration! George Floyd received just four years in prison for
armed robbery. The Post doesn’t mention it, but the victims were
Hispanic, and the woman who had the gun pointed at her stomach was pregnant.
Anyone who finds the Post article to constitute a convincing argument
that anyone but George Floyd—and the tragically self-destructive
community that acculturated him— is responsible for his miserable,
anti-social, drug- and crime-polluted life is not worth arguing with.
The scary question is: How many such people are there?
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
What about your nigger friend Morton? What's his excuse?
He is a law-abiding man, as well as a veteran of the United States Army!
Michael
Sounds like one of those uppity types. Be careful of those; they can
be the worst of negroes if you're not careful. You are best served if
you keep them in their place.
The Peeler
2020-10-14 06:59:27 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 13 Oct 2020 22:50:22 -0400, Loose Sphincter, the unhappily married
Post by NEMO
Post by Michael Ejercito
He is a law-abiding man, as well as a veteran of the United States Army!
Michael
Sounds like one of those uppity types. Be careful of those; they can
be the worst of negroes if you're not careful. You are best served if
you keep them in their place.
The one uppity asshole here is you, you typical, projecting, retarded
nazoid!

You nazoids project the very moment you open your stupid gobs. The
historical nazis were like that too. That notorious projection keeps
revealing your terminal stupidity!
--
Loose Sphincter about his passion:
" I love eating the Shit out of Poor Helpless Dumb Goran Razovic! LOL"
MID: <***@4ax.com>
Michael Ejercito
2020-10-14 13:43:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by NEMO
On Tue, 13 Oct 2020 06:18:53 -0700, Michael Ejercito
Post by Michael Ejercito
Post by NEMO
Post by Michael Ejercito
http://ethicsalarms.com/2020/10/12/personal-responsibility-what-personal-responsibility-the-washington-post-explains-how-aspiring-supreme-court-justice-george-floyd-was-destroyed-by-systemic-racism
October 12, 2020 / Jack Marshall
Screen shot of George Floyd mural
You think I’m kidding, don’t you? Sadly, I’m not.
Here’s a silver lining: thanks to the parade of bizarre and illogical
demands and assertions during the George Floyd Ethics Train Wreck and
the concomitant “Great Stupid,” my head appears to be immune from
explosions. (Is head immunity anything like herd immunity? A topic for
another time…)
It is amazing—I would have once said head exploding—that anyone would
attempt to sanctify a long-time criminal and blight on his community
like George Floyd, much less get away with it. Nonetheless, months
after Floyd died after a cruel and incompetent (but not racist) police
officer put his knee on Floyd’s neck, the news media and Black Lives
Matter flacks are successfully selling the tall tale that his life was a
tragedy of unfulfilled potential because he had the misfortune to live
in the United States of America.
[Quick review: Floyd moved to Minneapolis after being released from
Texas prison for aggravated robbery. He went to jail 5 times and as a
perusal of his record shows, he can be fairly described as a career
criminal. Floyd was a habitual lawbreaker, involved in drug abuse,
theft, criminal trespassing, and aggravated robbery, who once broke into
a woman’s home and pointed a gun at her stomach while looking for drugs
and money. He had probably taken an overdose of fentanyl and
methamphetamine at the time of arrest, and it is quite likely that this,
and not Derek Chauvin’s knee, is what killed him.]
I’m old enough, more’s the pity, to remember the Sixties fad of arguing
that all criminals were victims of their upbringing and a Hobbesian
society for those who were not white and rich, and that it was heartless
to punish those who were really society’s victims, not its predators.
This was a very old progressive trope, notably championed by Clarence
Darrow, who argued that there is no free will, and that criminals are
doomed from birth, this making it an abuse of power for society to
punish them. This logic was the epitome of bleeding heart liberalism,
and helped make the word “liberal” a term of derision. I did not expect
it to make a comeback.
Yes, I’m an idiot.
Now, however, in no less a legitimate forum than the Washington Post,
Toluse Olorunnipa and Griff Witte make the argument that if the U.S
wasn’t so racist, Floyd, despite all outward appearances, might have
been a great American.
Read the thing, take a while to tape your skull back together, and then
resume reading here. Watch out; this is the third paragraph, and it
“Early in life, he wanted to be a Supreme Court justice. Then, a
pro athlete. At the end, he just longed for a little stability, training
to be a commercial truck driver.“
If I recall, I wanted to be Superman early in life. Is that information
really relevant to anything? I strongly suspect that if young George was
really interested in a judicial career, he might have begun by learning
some basics about the law, like, say “Don’t break it.” After Superman
looked like a non-starter, I moved my ambition to the Presidency. By the
fifth grade, I had read every book about Presidents I could find at the
library. My parents started me off with a paperback that cost about
three bucks. The Post article never explains how systemic racism
prevents curiosity, initiative, and achievement.
[ Quick Review 2: George was one of five children born to parents who
weren’t married, and followed the family tradition, also having five
children with an undetermined number of women, setting those kids out on
the same perilous life path he trod. Interestingly, I can find no
example of a Supreme Court Justice who accumulated offspring out of
wedlock.]
Some highlights on this long, meticulously researched ( “according to an
extensive review of his life based on hundreds of documents and
interviews with more than 150 people, including his siblings, extended
family members, friends, colleagues, public officials and scholars”)
“Floyd was born in Fayetteville, N.C., in 1973, a time when
Whites-only service at restaurants and segregated seating in movie
theaters were fresh wounds.”
The Civil Rights Act had been passed a decade earlier. The Post’s
argument seems to be that Floyd was handicapped for life by a system no
longer in existence.
“When Floyd was two days old, Maynard Jackson was elected mayor of
Atlanta. It was the first time a major Southern city would have a Black
leader.“
Again, George Floyd was born into a U.S. where African Americans had
legally ensured opportunities to succeed. He lacked the determination
and character to take advantage of them
“Schools remained deeply unequal as Floyd moved through
predominantly Black classrooms in the 1980s and early 1990s. At Yates, a
former “colored” school named for a minister who was born enslaved, test
scores were low and dropout rates high, with the 1989 valedictorian —
who was seven months pregnant at the time — noting in her graduation
speech that more than half of freshmen had failed to graduate.“
This paragraph is res ipsa loquitur. You have to make a special effort
not to see the irony in it.
“By the time Floyd left high school in 1993, he wasn’t academically
prepared to go to college. But his athletic skills earned him a place at
a two-year program in South Florida before he transferred closer to home
— to Texas A&M University-Kingsville, a small, mostly Latino school
known as a pipeline to the NFL.“
A cynical critic of this section writes, with some justification, “It’s
so racist that if you’re a non-Asian minority, you’re more likely to get
into college than a white or Asian student with the same test scores.”
“Floyd, a tight end, went to practice every day, but he wasn’t
making the grades or completing the credits that would have allowed him
to get on the field.“
Floyd had an opportunity. He didn’t make the most of it. Blaming anyone
but himself makes him a victim of a not systemic racism, but cultural
maleducation.
“Floyd’s time in college ended with neither a degree nor a draft
into professional sports. With his two planned routes out of Third Ward
blocked, he moved back to Cuney Homes in 1997.“
Blocked? Blocked? Who blocked them? Floyd was in complete control of
whether he would graduate, or excel in sports sufficiently to make it
his career. He also was responsible fr failing to use college to develop
skills that would help him gain employment should his sports aspirations
not pan out.
“It didn’t take much time before he was in trouble with the law.
Police — described by residents as an omnipresent force around Cuney
Homes — arrested him in August 1997 for delivering less than a gram of
cocaine.”
Ah, if only Floyd had read a bit about what becoming a Supreme Court
Justice entailed! Meanwhile, the Post’s argument is that the presence of
police caused Floyd’s criminal conduct. After all, if a crime is
committed without being detected, was it really committed at all?
“The most serious charge that Floyd faced was in 2007, for
aggravated robbery with a deadly weapon. Prosecutors said the
then-33-year-old and four others forced their way into a private home
and that Floyd had held a woman at gunpoint while others ransacked the
place, looking for drugs and money….After a plea deal, Floyd would spend
four years at a privately run prison nearly three hours northwest of
Houston.”
Mass incarceration! George Floyd received just four years in prison for
armed robbery. The Post doesn’t mention it, but the victims were
Hispanic, and the woman who had the gun pointed at her stomach was pregnant.
Anyone who finds the Post article to constitute a convincing argument
that anyone but George Floyd—and the tragically self-destructive
community that acculturated him— is responsible for his miserable,
anti-social, drug- and crime-polluted life is not worth arguing with.
The scary question is: How many such people are there?
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
What about your nigger friend Morton? What's his excuse?
He is a law-abiding man, as well as a veteran of the United States Army!
Michael
Sounds like one of those uppity types. Be careful of those; they can
be the worst of negroes if you're not careful. You are best served if
you keep them in their place.
He greatly influenced my own political views for the past
twenty-four years!



Michael
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
Sick old nazoid paedo Andrew "Andrzej" Baron
2020-10-14 13:44:31 UTC
Permalink
IN MEMORIAM: poem for a dead limey nazoid
-----------------------------------------
Nazi Nicky sucked a dicky
and he surely wasn't picky
that is why the little sicky
lies under a filthy bricky!

--In puking memory of the cocksucking limey nazoid
Nicky Crane who, much to the joy of decent people
everywhere, died of AIDS.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicky_Crane
NEMO
2020-10-14 14:02:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Ejercito
Post by NEMO
On Tue, 13 Oct 2020 06:18:53 -0700, Michael Ejercito
Post by Michael Ejercito
Post by NEMO
Post by Michael Ejercito
http://ethicsalarms.com/2020/10/12/personal-responsibility-what-personal-responsibility-the-washington-post-explains-how-aspiring-supreme-court-justice-george-floyd-was-destroyed-by-systemic-racism
October 12, 2020 / Jack Marshall
Screen shot of George Floyd mural
You think I’m kidding, don’t you? Sadly, I’m not.
Here’s a silver lining: thanks to the parade of bizarre and illogical
demands and assertions during the George Floyd Ethics Train Wreck and
the concomitant “Great Stupid,” my head appears to be immune from
explosions. (Is head immunity anything like herd immunity? A topic for
another time…)
It is amazing—I would have once said head exploding—that anyone would
attempt to sanctify a long-time criminal and blight on his community
like George Floyd, much less get away with it. Nonetheless, months
after Floyd died after a cruel and incompetent (but not racist) police
officer put his knee on Floyd’s neck, the news media and Black Lives
Matter flacks are successfully selling the tall tale that his life was a
tragedy of unfulfilled potential because he had the misfortune to live
in the United States of America.
[Quick review: Floyd moved to Minneapolis after being released from
Texas prison for aggravated robbery. He went to jail 5 times and as a
perusal of his record shows, he can be fairly described as a career
criminal. Floyd was a habitual lawbreaker, involved in drug abuse,
theft, criminal trespassing, and aggravated robbery, who once broke into
a woman’s home and pointed a gun at her stomach while looking for drugs
and money. He had probably taken an overdose of fentanyl and
methamphetamine at the time of arrest, and it is quite likely that this,
and not Derek Chauvin’s knee, is what killed him.]
I’m old enough, more’s the pity, to remember the Sixties fad of arguing
that all criminals were victims of their upbringing and a Hobbesian
society for those who were not white and rich, and that it was heartless
to punish those who were really society’s victims, not its predators.
This was a very old progressive trope, notably championed by Clarence
Darrow, who argued that there is no free will, and that criminals are
doomed from birth, this making it an abuse of power for society to
punish them. This logic was the epitome of bleeding heart liberalism,
and helped make the word “liberal” a term of derision. I did not expect
it to make a comeback.
Yes, I’m an idiot.
Now, however, in no less a legitimate forum than the Washington Post,
Toluse Olorunnipa and Griff Witte make the argument that if the U.S
wasn’t so racist, Floyd, despite all outward appearances, might have
been a great American.
Read the thing, take a while to tape your skull back together, and then
resume reading here. Watch out; this is the third paragraph, and it
“Early in life, he wanted to be a Supreme Court justice. Then, a
pro athlete. At the end, he just longed for a little stability, training
to be a commercial truck driver.“
If I recall, I wanted to be Superman early in life. Is that information
really relevant to anything? I strongly suspect that if young George was
really interested in a judicial career, he might have begun by learning
some basics about the law, like, say “Don’t break it.” After Superman
looked like a non-starter, I moved my ambition to the Presidency. By the
fifth grade, I had read every book about Presidents I could find at the
library. My parents started me off with a paperback that cost about
three bucks. The Post article never explains how systemic racism
prevents curiosity, initiative, and achievement.
[ Quick Review 2: George was one of five children born to parents who
weren’t married, and followed the family tradition, also having five
children with an undetermined number of women, setting those kids out on
the same perilous life path he trod. Interestingly, I can find no
example of a Supreme Court Justice who accumulated offspring out of
wedlock.]
Some highlights on this long, meticulously researched ( “according to an
extensive review of his life based on hundreds of documents and
interviews with more than 150 people, including his siblings, extended
family members, friends, colleagues, public officials and scholars”)
“Floyd was born in Fayetteville, N.C., in 1973, a time when
Whites-only service at restaurants and segregated seating in movie
theaters were fresh wounds.”
The Civil Rights Act had been passed a decade earlier. The Post’s
argument seems to be that Floyd was handicapped for life by a system no
longer in existence.
“When Floyd was two days old, Maynard Jackson was elected mayor of
Atlanta. It was the first time a major Southern city would have a Black
leader.“
Again, George Floyd was born into a U.S. where African Americans had
legally ensured opportunities to succeed. He lacked the determination
and character to take advantage of them
“Schools remained deeply unequal as Floyd moved through
predominantly Black classrooms in the 1980s and early 1990s. At Yates, a
former “colored” school named for a minister who was born enslaved, test
scores were low and dropout rates high, with the 1989 valedictorian —
who was seven months pregnant at the time — noting in her graduation
speech that more than half of freshmen had failed to graduate.“
This paragraph is res ipsa loquitur. You have to make a special effort
not to see the irony in it.
“By the time Floyd left high school in 1993, he wasn’t academically
prepared to go to college. But his athletic skills earned him a place at
a two-year program in South Florida before he transferred closer to home
— to Texas A&M University-Kingsville, a small, mostly Latino school
known as a pipeline to the NFL.“
A cynical critic of this section writes, with some justification, “It’s
so racist that if you’re a non-Asian minority, you’re more likely to get
into college than a white or Asian student with the same test scores.”
“Floyd, a tight end, went to practice every day, but he wasn’t
making the grades or completing the credits that would have allowed him
to get on the field.“
Floyd had an opportunity. He didn’t make the most of it. Blaming anyone
but himself makes him a victim of a not systemic racism, but cultural
maleducation.
“Floyd’s time in college ended with neither a degree nor a draft
into professional sports. With his two planned routes out of Third Ward
blocked, he moved back to Cuney Homes in 1997.“
Blocked? Blocked? Who blocked them? Floyd was in complete control of
whether he would graduate, or excel in sports sufficiently to make it
his career. He also was responsible fr failing to use college to develop
skills that would help him gain employment should his sports aspirations
not pan out.
“It didn’t take much time before he was in trouble with the law.
Police — described by residents as an omnipresent force around Cuney
Homes — arrested him in August 1997 for delivering less than a gram of
cocaine.”
Ah, if only Floyd had read a bit about what becoming a Supreme Court
Justice entailed! Meanwhile, the Post’s argument is that the presence of
police caused Floyd’s criminal conduct. After all, if a crime is
committed without being detected, was it really committed at all?
“The most serious charge that Floyd faced was in 2007, for
aggravated robbery with a deadly weapon. Prosecutors said the
then-33-year-old and four others forced their way into a private home
and that Floyd had held a woman at gunpoint while others ransacked the
place, looking for drugs and money….After a plea deal, Floyd would spend
four years at a privately run prison nearly three hours northwest of
Houston.”
Mass incarceration! George Floyd received just four years in prison for
armed robbery. The Post doesn’t mention it, but the victims were
Hispanic, and the woman who had the gun pointed at her stomach was pregnant.
Anyone who finds the Post article to constitute a convincing argument
that anyone but George Floyd—and the tragically self-destructive
community that acculturated him— is responsible for his miserable,
anti-social, drug- and crime-polluted life is not worth arguing with.
The scary question is: How many such people are there?
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
What about your nigger friend Morton? What's his excuse?
He is a law-abiding man, as well as a veteran of the United States Army!
Michael
Sounds like one of those uppity types. Be careful of those; they can
be the worst of negroes if you're not careful. You are best served if
you keep them in their place.
He greatly influenced my own political views for the past
twenty-four years!
Try forming your own views. Going through life thinking like a nigger can be detrimental.
NEMO
2020-10-14 14:05:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by NEMO
Try forming your own views.
His views are correct, including the view that you are a shiteating,
pissdrinking, donkeydicksucking, grannyfucking, jizzlicking,
motherless pile of sub-excrement nazoid PAEDO filth who takes dozens
of muzzie dicks up his arse and throat on an hourly basis.

BTW, good work infecting Pigshit Walt Hampton with AIDS. LOL!
The Peeler
2020-10-14 16:02:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by NEMO
Post by NEMO
Try forming your own views.
His views are correct, including the view that you are a shiteating,
pissdrinking, donkeydicksucking, grannyfucking, jizzlicking,
motherless pile of sub-excrement nazoid PAEDO filth who takes dozens
of muzzie dicks up his arse and throat on an hourly basis.
BTW, good work infecting Pigshit Walt Hampton with AIDS. LOL!
Well said!
Michael Ejercito
2020-10-19 01:53:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Peeler
Post by NEMO
Post by NEMO
Try forming your own views.
His views are correct, including the view that you are a shiteating,
pissdrinking, donkeydicksucking, grannyfucking, jizzlicking,
motherless pile of sub-excrement nazoid PAEDO filth who takes dozens
of muzzie dicks up his arse and throat on an hourly basis.
BTW, good work infecting Pigshit Walt Hampton with AIDS. LOL!
Well said!
Indeed.


Michael
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
The Peeler
2020-10-13 14:16:33 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 13 Oct 2020 03:20:30 -0700 (PDT), Loose Sphincter, the unhappily
Post by NEMO
What about your nigger friend Morton? What's his excuse?
Always obsessed with your superiors, eh, inferior nazitard? It's one of the
hallmarks of every true nazi! <BG>
--
Loose Sphincter about his passion:
" I love eating the Shit out of Poor Helpless Dumb Goran Razovic! LOL"
MID: <***@4ax.com>
Michael Ejercito
2020-10-17 16:12:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Peeler
On Tue, 13 Oct 2020 03:20:30 -0700 (PDT), Loose Sphincter, the unhappily
Post by NEMO
What about your nigger friend Morton? What's his excuse?
Always obsessed with your superiors, eh, inferior nazitard? It's one of the
hallmarks of every true nazi! <BG>
He is just so jealous of Chris!


Michael
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
NEMO
2020-10-13 20:48:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by NEMO
What about your nigger friend
What about that old cocksucker friend of your, Pigshit Walt Hampton?

Did you infect him with AIDS, cocksucker?
NEMO
2020-10-14 02:50:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by NEMO
Post by NEMO
What about your nigger friend
What about that old cocksucker friend of your, Pigshit Walt Hampton?
Did you infect him with AIDS, cocksucker?
You miss him, don'tcha? Your life is empty without him.
The Peeler
2020-10-14 07:01:35 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 13 Oct 2020 22:50:31 -0400, Loose Sphincter, the unhappily married
Post by NEMO
What about that old cocksucker friend of your, Pigshit Walt Hampton?
Did you infect him with AIDS, cocksucker?
I miss him, I certainly do! My life is empty without him.
There, I made some minor corrections so as to reveal your notorious
projection again, you projecting gay nazoid!
--
Loose Sphincter about his passion:
" I love eating the Shit out of Poor Helpless Dumb Goran Razovic! LOL"
MID: <***@4ax.com>
NEMO
2020-10-14 13:03:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by NEMO
What about that old cocksucker friend of your, Pigshit Walt Hampton?
Did you infect him with AIDS, cocksucker?
It was his fault. I told him not to swallow.
Sick pig!
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